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For the record, I drew it. Jonathan is responsible for the juvenile text.

Battle Lines has its first review. From Kirkus (2/15/15):

A graphic rendering of epic destruction and intimate despair, as the authors make Civil War scholarship come alive for readers young and old.The artistry of Fetter-Vorm (Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb, 2013) powerfully captures the devastation that the war wreaked on the country, extending well past the armistice, while the historical context by Bancroft Prize winner Kelman (American Civil War Era History/Penn State Univ.; A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek, 2013, etc.) provides the contextual depth. In the preface, the authors ask, “what hope could there be for a country so deeply divided against itself, a country so thoroughly drenched in the blood of its own people?” The chapters that follow humanize that history from various perspectives: the black man freed into another kind of servitude, Irish immigrants rebelling against conscription, women left behind without provisions for survival after their husbands and sons went to war. But the most arresting images throughout are panoramas, two-page spreads, where text is minimal or nonexistent and the chaos and carnage speak for themselves. The power of the art puts the “graphic” in graphic narrative, with limbs amputated by saws, corpses that could no longer be identified as belonging to one side or another, and battlefields turned to slaughter. Interspersed with these large-scale depictions are vignettes of those touched in various ways by the war, from the well-known poet Walt Whitman to soldiers only known by the journals they left behind. Without the illustrations, the text seems aimed at a young-adult or even younger readership, but the artistic impact extends far beyond. In this gripping graphic narrative, the complexities of history achieve clarity, and the depth of the tragedy has a visceral impact.

No star, though. Jonathan got a star for his last book. I didn’t. I think I see the problem here.

Sand Creek document dump.

With the sesquicentennial anniversary of Sand Creek just a couple of days away, here’s a partial list of recent resources about the massacre:

The University of Denver’s John Evans Study Report.

A Colorado Public Radio story about the above.

Northwestern University’s John Evans Study Committee’s Report.

Michael Allen’s long-form essay about his great-great-grandfather’s role at Sand Creek.

Tony Horwitz’s piece in Smithsonian about Sand Creek.

Patricia Calhoun’s post about John Evans’s descendants grappling with their ancestor’s involvement with the massacre.

The National Museum of the American Indian’s “Sand Creek Massacre: 150 Year Remembrance.”

The State of Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre Commemoration Committee site.

If you’ve got anything to add, please leave a comment. Thanks!